Jenna Nicholl

Portraiture
This is my final selection studio portrait.  It was a bit of a balancing act trying to ensure as even a backdrop possible whilst preventing it from washing out my models feet.  There was also alot of manoveuring of the key light as it started on a stand and gradually made it’s way onto a boom due to it protruding into the frame.  It was a definite learning curve in terms of the backdrop but a valuable one.  I am still worried about my models body positioning for the latter stages of editing as, as suspected it was difficult to mimick leaning against a wall (no matter the amount of sample images).  I am happy with the overall image but would have liked more depth of shadow in the eye sockets and of course to accentuate the lean but im not sure theres software than can do that so I will live with that for now.  

This is my final selection studio portrait.  It was a bit of a balancing act trying to ensure as even a backdrop possible whilst preventing it from washing out my models feet.  There was also alot of manoveuring of the key light as it started on a stand and gradually made it’s way onto a boom due to it protruding into the frame.  It was a definite learning curve in terms of the backdrop but a valuable one.  I am still worried about my models body positioning for the latter stages of editing as, as suspected it was difficult to mimick leaning against a wall (no matter the amount of sample images).  I am happy with the overall image but would have liked more depth of shadow in the eye sockets and of course to accentuate the lean but im not sure theres software than can do that so I will live with that for now.  

I was all over the West end of Glasgow and in partick trying to find a suitable location for this shoot.  Alot of the areas that are cobbled with a significant slope, have bollards, railings and cars….lots and lots of cars.  I’m still worried that the angle of the subject and the background are going to be difficult to authentically marry together.  Also the lighting in these alleyways are very limited therefore I am still playing around with the time of day to shoot to get the suface highlights on the cobbles. This is where we’re at, at the moment

I was all over the West end of Glasgow and in partick trying to find a suitable location for this shoot.  Alot of the areas that are cobbled with a significant slope, have bollards, railings and cars….lots and lots of cars.  I’m still worried that the angle of the subject and the background are going to be difficult to authentically marry together.  Also the lighting in these alleyways are very limited therefore I am still playing around with the time of day to shoot to get the suface highlights on the cobbles. This is where we’re at, at the moment

Move Poster - Take 2!!!
Ive decided to recreate movie poster for the film ”Walk the Line”
Ive already organised a model who I think is perfect for the shoot and he’s keen too which always helps.  Ive also checked out a location in the west end of glasgow for the location shoot but need to get someone to come out with me to see how the light falls on my subject to make recreating the image in studio easier. 
When I saw the poster I couldnt help but love the grainy simplicity of the image and I feel its an accurate depiction of the film itself.  Im horribly aware that I was warned off full length shots (the feet are cropped out of frame though) but well lets look at it more as a challenge than a problem. 
Some of the technical aspects bouncing around my brain at the moment are the mid to low viewpoint / the ackward angle my subject will have to recreate without the aid of a wall in studio / the grain within the image and how far I should go to try and recreate this in camera (ND Filter galore) / The difficulty cutting out that guitar edge when it comes to post production work due to the specular highlight. 
Initally I was put off by the simplicity of this image and thought I may be letting myself down by choosing somthing fairly simple but better a simple image done well than a complicated image done poorly.
Intend to shoot my background image this thursday and we’ll go from there

Move Poster - Take 2!!!

Ive decided to recreate movie poster for the film ”Walk the Line”

Ive already organised a model who I think is perfect for the shoot and he’s keen too which always helps.  Ive also checked out a location in the west end of glasgow for the location shoot but need to get someone to come out with me to see how the light falls on my subject to make recreating the image in studio easier. 

When I saw the poster I couldnt help but love the grainy simplicity of the image and I feel its an accurate depiction of the film itself.  Im horribly aware that I was warned off full length shots (the feet are cropped out of frame though) but well lets look at it more as a challenge than a problem. 

Some of the technical aspects bouncing around my brain at the moment are the mid to low viewpoint / the ackward angle my subject will have to recreate without the aid of a wall in studio / the grain within the image and how far I should go to try and recreate this in camera (ND Filter galore) / The difficulty cutting out that guitar edge when it comes to post production work due to the specular highlight. 

Initally I was put off by the simplicity of this image and thought I may be letting myself down by choosing somthing fairly simple but better a simple image done well than a complicated image done poorly.

Intend to shoot my background image this thursday and we’ll go from there

Movie Poster
My original idea for my movie poster was The Shining, however after much discussion with various lecturers and other students Im struggling to see how I can do it in such a way that fulfils both aspects of the brief
1. Individual portrait on white background
2. Make the subjects face appear the appropriate shape without using some sort of door prop in the studio shot.
Long story cut short, Ive decided to change ideas and try not to trip myself up before I even begin. 

Movie Poster

My original idea for my movie poster was The Shining, however after much discussion with various lecturers and other students Im struggling to see how I can do it in such a way that fulfils both aspects of the brief

1. Individual portrait on white background

2. Make the subjects face appear the appropriate shape without using some sort of door prop in the studio shot.

Long story cut short, Ive decided to change ideas and try not to trip myself up before I even begin. 

The Final Destination - Self Portrait Submission
This is my final selection for my self portrait and it has not been without its challenges (focus, focus, focus).  Sorry for the lack of blogging but trial and error took priority.  My concept for this image was to acknowledge my height whilst making the point that I don’t (quite so literally) button up the back.
In order to achieve this image I stuck buttons down my spine and buttoned my red coat down my back.  I then turned to face the wall, turning my back on the camera and set the camera on self timer.  I used a simple household lamp and directed it so it fell on both myself and the wall behind.
Whilst I am happy with the finished result, there are things I would like to change.  The lighting for example seems overly simplistic and I feel more contrast where the buttons fall would have emphasized them as a focal point.  I feel a higher viewpoint could have added to the perception of height but this is just being picky.  I feel I have successfully captured the quirky side of my personality through my choice of clothing however the message was perhaps lost in translation during my feedback session.
Feedback highlighted the quirky side of my image and also acknowledged a sense of strength of character projected through the bold choice of both colours and props.  Some people would have like to see some space at the top of the image cropped out, however the majority acknowledge its place in emphasizing my height.  My feedback has overall been positive but feel free all to highlight any feedback I may have missed.

The Final Destination - Self Portrait Submission

This is my final selection for my self portrait and it has not been without its challenges (focus, focus, focus).  Sorry for the lack of blogging but trial and error took priority.  My concept for this image was to acknowledge my height whilst making the point that I don’t (quite so literally) button up the back.

In order to achieve this image I stuck buttons down my spine and buttoned my red coat down my back.  I then turned to face the wall, turning my back on the camera and set the camera on self timer.  I used a simple household lamp and directed it so it fell on both myself and the wall behind.

Whilst I am happy with the finished result, there are things I would like to change.  The lighting for example seems overly simplistic and I feel more contrast where the buttons fall would have emphasized them as a focal point.  I feel a higher viewpoint could have added to the perception of height but this is just being picky.  I feel I have successfully captured the quirky side of my personality through my choice of clothing however the message was perhaps lost in translation during my feedback session.

Feedback highlighted the quirky side of my image and also acknowledged a sense of strength of character projected through the bold choice of both colours and props.  Some people would have like to see some space at the top of the image cropped out, however the majority acknowledge its place in emphasizing my height.  My feedback has overall been positive but feel free all to highlight any feedback I may have missed.

I decided to try a self portrait with a difference as part of my NQ.  It has encouraged me to try different techniques, crops, colour balance, viewpoints etc to keep my images interesting and fun.

I decided to try a self portrait with a difference as part of my NQ.  It has encouraged me to try different techniques, crops, colour balance, viewpoints etc to keep my images interesting and fun.

The camera always points both ways.
In expressing your subject, you also express yourself.
~ Freeman Patterson

http://www.utata.org/articles//feature/13302.php

This quote acknowledges the influence of the photographer in creating an image and not simply taking the image.  As photographers we go to great lengths to capture our subject in their best light and in order to do so we tweak positions, we control lighting, we choose a viewpoint, we converse with our sitter to put them at ease until eventually our creative choices are as much a part of the image as the sitter themselves.